Alice Walker books

Alice Walker

Alice Malsenior Tallulah-Kate Walker is an American novelist, short story writer, poet, and social activist. In 1982, she became the first African-American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, which she was awarded for her novel The Color Purple.


Books

This novel is a rich celebration of mothers who have, in the age of crack cocaine, been forced to raise their own grandchildren, having lost their daughters to the epidemic. It is word perfect, sometimes hilarious, always honest to the life of its characters and to “ghetto” society. I don’t understand the title of the book or the book jacket art, but the book itself is essential reading for these and future times. I recommend audio for a captivating listening experience.
I couldn’t sleep after reading this book. I felt a duty to read it, however, and others like it, to know without forgetting, that for countries devastated by war, often wars “we” cause, or extend by carpet bombing or laying of land mines, the suffering, usually for the most vulnerable, never ends.
In Daniel Black’s extraordinary book “The Coming,” we have an unprecedented opportunity to be with ancestors who probably never dreamed a scribe would one day appear to make their descendants not only imagine their plight but also, by being brought to tears by the narrative, gain access to an emotion that makes us one with them. Shamanic work.
I am rereading this incredible novel about a young boy in the Deep South who was raised until he was 8 as if he were a girl. A fantastic investigation of gender issues, large and small. Audio is ideal for this book, especially for readers who did not grow up in the South.
This is my favorite Angelou book. It is revelatory about a life of high adventure with her completely tough, gun-toting, charming, fearless and seductive mother.
I was 11 when I read it and it encouraged me to believe the world was large, fascinating, and with incredibly interesting creatures in it! And I have discovered this to be true! So when I fall in love, for instance, it is never an impediment that the object of my affections might be, or seem to others to be, odd.
“Down and Out” is hilarious, with a humor quite unexpected in the otherwise seemingly somber Brother Blair. I listen to it often (a couple of places are dated and I have to skip) when I want to laugh.
In Daniel Black’s extraordinary book “The Coming,” we have an unprecedented opportunity to be with ancestors who probably never dreamed a scribe would one day appear to make their descendants not only imagine their plight but also, by being brought to tears by the narrative, gain access to an emotion that makes us one with them. Shamanic work.